SYNTAX ( NAILUL MUNA)

 

FORM OF RELATIVE CLAUSE

  1. WHO

E.g :

  • The boy who want got a prize
  • She is a girl who came yesterday

 

  1. WHOM

E.g :

  • I meet a friend whom I knew at college
  • I saw a girl whom I knew at market

 

  1. WHOSE

E.g :

  • We helped some people whose car broke down
  • The neighbor  whose dog I’m looking after in Australia

 

  1. WHICH

E.g :

  • Cars which are left here
  • The design which chosen for the logo

 

  1. THAT

E.g :

  • The team that Chelsea face is Arsenal
  • I hate the way that stuck

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PROBLEMS RELATIVE CLAUSE

 

  1. Be careful with punctuation. Do not use commas witch is restrictive adjective clauses.

Some adjective clause give information which is necessary in specifically identifying nouns. These clause are restrictive. Other adjective clauses give information which is not necessary in specifically identifying nouns. These are nonrestrictive. Use commas with nonrestrictive adjective clauses. Do not use commas with restrictive adjective clause.

E.g :

  • Do you know the *pages, which we’re supposed to read tonight?

The adjective clause is needed to show which pages are being talked about. A comma should not be used.

Do you know the pages which we’re supposed to read tonight? (right)

  1. Do not use prepositions with where or when. Instead, use which.

When where and where are used in adjective clauses, they are not used with preposition. The relative pronoun which may be used in this situation, however.

E.g :

  • That’s the room in *where I have class (wrong)

That’s the room where I have class (right)

  • Tomorrow is the day on* when he has his job interview (wrong)

Tomorrow is the day when he has his job interview ( right)

  1. Do not confuse whose with who’s or wit who he/she is.

E.g :

  • Judy is the want *who’s car was stolen last night (wrong)

            Judi is the want whose car stolen last night (right)

 

 

 

FORM OF ADVERB PHRASE

  1. The head of an adverb phrase

E.g :

  • Yet all too suddenly  Rosy popped back into conversation
  • Oddly enough, that very shudder did the business

 

  1. Adverb phrase + Complement

E.g :

  • It is Underneath the pink slip that I wore on Wednesday with my Mechiin

 

  1. Adverb phrase + frequently modifier

Eg :

  • They plow trough a heavy fog, and Enrique sleeps soundly

 

  1. Adjective + Adverb

Eg :

  • You fall into a really deep sleep
  • My aunt’Kinda deaf and she sleeps like  really  heavily

 

  1. Adverb phrase + Noun phrase

 Eg :

  • She stayed out in the middle of the wild sea, and told them that was quiet the loveliest place, you could

 

  1. Adverb phrase + modify  Determiner

Eg :

  • The devil knows   best what he said, but at least  she became his tool and was in the habit of seeing him nearly every evening

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FUNCTION OF NOUN CLAUSE

 

  1. SUBJECT

E.g :

  • What you said made the crowd angry
  • That his daughter stole his car surprises me

 

  1. SUBJECT COMPLEMENT

E.g :

  • That noise is the dog crying in his crate
  • The chief  will be whoever has blue ink on theirs hands

 

  1. DIRECT OBJECT

E.g :

  • I would hate for you to get sick
  • My mother had wanted me to organizer her photographs

 

  1. OBJECT COMPLEMENT

E.g :

  • You may call my husband whatever  you wish

 

  1. INDERECT OBJECT

E.g :

  • The committee  will give that the student want longer library hours some thought
  • My classmate gave me singing the school song a gold start

 

  1. PREPOTIONAL COMPLEMENT

E.g :

  • His wise listened to him singing in the shower
  • My puppy begged  for me to give him a treat

 

  1. ADJECTIVE PHRASE COMPLEMENT

 

 

 

E.g :

  • I am sad that my husband is ill
  • The child is sad that she cannot  have another cookie

 

  1. APPOSITIVE OR NOUN PHARSE COMPLEMENT

E.g :

  • Our hope that peace will be achieved is possible
  • My problem is the fact that you are always late for work

 

 

ADVERB CLAUSE

KINDS OF ADVERB CLAUSE :

  1. ADVERB CLAUSE OF TIME

 [ When, whenever, before, after, as]

E.g :

  • We got the umbrella before the rains came
  • I shall see until you have finished

 

  1. ADVERB CLAUSE OF PLACE

[Where and wherever]

E.g :

  • Wherever you go I shall follow you
  • Where there is a will there is a way

 

 

  1. ADVERB CLAUSE OF MANNER

[As, if, as thought and in that]

E.g :

  • You may do as you please
  • He look as if he were frightened

 

  1. ADVERB CLAUSE OF DEGREE

E.g :

  • She is not so nice as her mother
  • She is as wise as she is beautiful

 

  1. ADVERB CLAUSE OF CAUSE

[Give the reason for the activity mentioned in the main clause : because, since, as and that]

 

 

e.g :

  • I write because I like writing
  • I am glad  that  you do it

 

  1. ADVEB CLAUSE OF PURPOSE

[That, in order that, so that and lest]

e.g :

  • I worked hard so that I might  win the scholarship
  • Put on your warm clothes lest you catch a chill

 

  1. ADVERB CLAUSE OF RESULT OR CONSEQUENCE

[ So..that, such..that ]

E.g :

  • She was so weak that she cold  hardly stand
  • The famine was so severe that

 

  1. ADVERB CLAUSE OF CONDITION

[If, unless, whether, so, long as,]

E.g :

  • If  it rains the match will be cancelled
  • You have to do it whether you like it  or not

 

  1. ADVERB CLAUSE OF CONCESSION OR SUPPOSITION

[Thought, although, while and whereas]

E.g :

  • Thought he is poor he is honest
  • Although the elephant was strong it was no match for the agile tiger

 

 

 

 

 

FORM OF RELATIVE CLAUSE

  1. Adjective

E.g :

  • Families did certainly come, beguiled by representation of impossibly cheap provisions

 

  1. Adjective phrase + Complement [ that]

Eg :

  • During that brief time I was proud of my self

 

  1. Attributive and predicative

Eg :

  • Truly selfish genes do arise, in the sense that they reproduce themselves at cost

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

  • Boediono.  English Grammar, Jakarta: Bintang Indonesia. 2007
  • Eastwood. John. Oxford Grammar, New York: Oxford University. 2008.
  • Huddleston, Rodney. Introduction to the Grammar of English. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, 1984.
  • http://www.suite101.com
  • http://www.learn4good.com

 

Categories: Uncategorized | Tinggalkan komentar

Navigasi pos

Tinggalkan Balasan

Isikan data di bawah atau klik salah satu ikon untuk log in:

Logo WordPress.com

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Logout / Ubah )

Gambar Twitter

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Logout / Ubah )

Foto Facebook

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Logout / Ubah )

Foto Google+

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Logout / Ubah )

Connecting to %s

Buat situs web atau blog gratis di WordPress.com.

%d blogger menyukai ini: